Psychedelic Porn Crumpets are on the precipice of becoming one of Australia’s biggest psych-rock bands. Although their first release was only in 2016, the Perth band’s phenomenally mature sound and incredible live presence has well and truly established them as Australia’s latest break-out band.

In 2016 and 2017 the Psychedelic Porn Crumpets brought us the High Visceral saga consisting of High Visceral P.t 1, High VIsceral P.t 2 and High Visceral (B-Sides). Each release is a dense collection of meaty guitar riffs and hypnotic vocals. This year they’ve brought us a new single as well as a massive UK/EU/AU tour where they were greeted by sell-out shows and plays on BBC Radio 1, BBC Radio 6 and Radio X, who selected Cornflake as their ‘Big One’ Exposure Record. Hot off their tour, I had the chance to ask Australia’s break-out psych stars some questions. 

LB: Your songs are rich with a lovely blend of catchy riffs and introspective poetic lyricism. What can you tell me about the songwriting process for PPC tunes and who’s responsible for writing these parts? 

PPC: I’m glad you find them that attractive! Most of the lyrics are tales of our nights out which tend to keep up with the energy of the song. Everything’s autobiographical, it feels more real for a listener, like I genuinely found god in a tomato one night and felt like that needed to be jotted down. 

LB: For the music video of your latest single Social Candy, you mentioned The Mighty Boosh as an inspiration for the video; who else do you draw inspiration from, musically, poetically, visually or otherwise?
 

PPC: Wes Anderson, Douglas Adams, Edgar Wright, Hunter.S.Thompson, Ruban Nielson, Woody Allen, Monty Python, The Beatles, Banksy, TED talks and Joe Rogan when he’s rambling about ancient civilisations to Graham Hancock.

LB: Your albums evoke so many different emotions track-to-track, is that a conscious decision to keep the album engaging or does that just naturally arise?  

PPC: Thanks for thinking that. Most of the time I’ll just get carried away with an idea and the only logical thing seems to go bigger and add more instruments. Lately, I’ve been trying to minimise that sporadicness and hone in a single feature, then build the album rather than a song. High Visceral went so many places which I really liked, but the new album should hopefully feel more connected and cleaner than the last two releases.

LB: How would you describe the PPC sound? 

PPC: An energetic mess of colour and tone. Rick Sanchez’s wormhole gun, Jack Sparrow’s wit, The Cheshire Cats middle teeth

LB: I love the vocal processing you use on tracks, especially where it gets spacey like on Denmark / Van Gogh & Gone. Is it something you put much thought into?
 

PPC: Denmark [van gogh & gone] I wrote in about 10 minutes, it was the quickest song I’ve ever written. Then I spent about four weeks working on the layers and another 3-4 weeks with Jelly while mixing it which is probably the longest time we’ve spent in post-production on a track. I think the reason I go to town on effects is because when I first started I couldn’t sing to save my life. So I’d soak my voice in reverb and distort the life out of it, I used to transpose the WAV down so it’d sound way deeper and that’s how the first few PPC recordings lived. Then I couldn’t figure out how to emulate that live, so I had to try to sing normally, that’s the backward nature of the home recording artist these days I suppose.


LB: I’ve seen you three times and every time you’ve sent the crowd into an absolute frenzy, do you have any wild stories from playing such rowdy shows? 

PPC: We played a show at The Rosemount in Perth for our album launch last year and somebody brought a rooster along with them. Then when things started getting a bit wild the poor old rooster was launched into the air. One of our friends luckily found it after the show and made a poster for the lost bird. I think someone came and collected it so all was well.

LB: As a supremely DIY band, what lessons have you learned that you can impart on up-and-coming bands who want to follow in your steps?  

PPC: Learn to record yourself, save all your gig money for touring and write as many songs as possible even if they’re shit. YouTube has more Ableton tutorials than fail videos. Nobody listens to EPs anymore so release albums and if there’s some buzz around the release, press a small run of vinyl, ask your family and friends to help invest and then if they sell out press more. Go to gigs and meet people and watch other bands, contact local radio stations to play your tunes and put music first if you want it to work.

LB: After being played on BBC Radio 1, BBC 6 Music, Radio X and being selected as Radio X’s ‘Big One’ Exposure Record, how has this new level of exposure affected you as a band? 

PPC: It helped us sell out all our UK shows which was incredible. We were amazed by the fans in Europe, we thought there’d be like three people at each show but the turnouts were solid. Cool people too, had a great trip.

 LB: After making a huge splash in the UK and Europe, do the Porn Crumpets have plans to take on an American tour? 

PPC: We’d love to, that’s the big one really isn’t it? There’s always a bunch of comments on our socials asking for a visit so we can’t wait to share the news we’ll be coming for a visit, hopefully soon.

LB: Jack, I love your work on the album art, although I’ve noticed you’ve had other artists come in to design the merch and the Social Candy album. Will you be taking more of a curatorial role in designing the Porn Crumpets’ art direction? 

 PPC: Zouassi designed the High Visceral album covers, he’s the genius behind those, I just designed the gatefold stuff. We wanted to go in a new direction for this new album so we started working with Ben Giles. His collage style is great, it’s instantly recognisable and hits you with an emotional response too, it’ll be a nice accompaniment to the new record.“ 

LB: Jack you’ve been sporting the Jazzmaster for a while now, is there something, in particular, you love about the guitar? 

PPC: It’s the warmest guitar I’ve ever played. The clean tone is beautiful and it’s a monster with a fuzz pedal. I use heavier strings on it too so the chords have a thicker sound.

LB: As Perth locals, are there any great Perth bands you can recommend that the rest of Australia won’t be familiar with? 

PPC: Carla Geneva is a great new act, Demon Days too. Old Blood are one of Perth’s greatest bands that should be huge. Otherwise give The Southern River Band a crank!

If for some reason you’ve read this far and you haven’t yet listened to the sounds of the Psychedelic Porn Crumpets then I implore you to dig through all their releases, starting with their latest single Social Candy.

Psychedelic Porn Crumpets Social Candy Tour

Thursday October 4th – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, NSW

Friday October 5th – The Zoo, Brisbane, QLD

Saturday October 6th – Solbar, Maroochydore, QLD

Sunday October 7th – Miami Marketta, Gold Coast, QLD

Thursday October 11th – Karova Lounge, Ballarat, VIC

Friday October 12th – Corner Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Saturday October 13th – Adelaide Unibar, Adelaide, SA

Friday October 19th – The Rosemount Hotel, Perth WA

Friday October 26th – Settlers Tavern, Margaret River, WA